New NY law allows first responders to remove animals left in vehicles

The law takes effect immediately under conditions in which the animal is in danger of death or severe injury due to exposure


By Observer-Dispatch
Observer-Dispatch, Utica, N.Y.

NEW YORK — Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation today allowing emergency responders to remove distressed animals left unattended in motor vehicles.

The law adds language to the state's agriculture and markets law to allow EMS personnel, paid firefighters, and volunteer firefighters -- when they are directed to assist affected animals while performing their volunteer duties -- to take necessary steps to remove unattended animals from the vehicle.

The law adds language to the state's agriculture and markets law to allow EMS personnel, paid firefighters, and volunteer firefighters to take necessary steps to remove unattended animals from the vehicle. (Photo/Tribune News Service)
The law adds language to the state's agriculture and markets law to allow EMS personnel, paid firefighters, and volunteer firefighters to take necessary steps to remove unattended animals from the vehicle. (Photo/Tribune News Service)

The conditions outlined under the law include extreme heat or cold without proper ventilation or other protection, which puts the animal in danger of death or serious injury due to exposure, according to the law.

"Leaving a pet in a stifling hot or freezing cold car is inhumane and potentially dangerous, and emergency responders should have the ability to remove them if necessary," Cuomo said in a statement. "As a dog owner myself, I am proud to sign this measure into law to help ensure the safety and wellbeing of animals."

The law takes effect immediately.

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©2019 Observer-Dispatch, Utica, N.Y.

 

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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